Being a lover of all things British, I follow Lady Carnarvon’s blog and was inspired by her recent Supper Guests post here. Which led me to consider who I’d invite to supper if I could! And which reminded me of touring Inveraray Castle in Scotland and this place setting I’d captured while there. It belies the grandeur and elegance of the dining room on my simple camera but it does work for this humble post!

So, who would I love to sit down with for supper? And what would we eat? Haggis leaps to mind. And the sausages that are the best I’ve ever tasted. I love it, oddly enough, and had it every day I could on each of my trips there. And the sausages that are the best I’ve ever tasted. Cock-a-leekie soup is another win. Fresh fish, for certain. And tea and scones, aye! But not necessarily in that order and not all together:)

Guest 1

Mary Queen of Scots

I’ve always had a soft spot for this impetuous Scottish queen. She was of a queenly height at almost 6 feet but is said to have been very graceful and beautiful. Most women then were 5’4. I’m sure she towered over most of her male courtiers. She became queen when just 6 days old. She was multi-lingual. A rival to Queen Elizabeth whom she never met. She was imprisoned almost 20 years then beheaded.

Guest 2

John Knox

He would be seated at the opposite end of the table to Queen Mary as they clashed at every turn. Knox helped bring about the reformation in Scotland, opposed Catholics and pushed for Protestantism. Long on the law and short on grace, he was one of Mary’s foremost enemies. Ahead of her time, Mary thought Catholics and Protestants should practice their faith peacefully and not be persecuted. Knox is hailed as the founder of Presbyterianism. My Scottish ancestors were Catholic then Protestant. Despite their lands and titles being forfeit in the Jacobite Rising of 1715 and their subsequent exile to Virginia, their Presbyterian roots are still practiced by my father’s family today.

Guest 3

Daniel Boone

What would the intrepid Boone think of Mary, Queen of Scots and John Knox, I wonder? No doubt they might engage in a rousing debate given Boone’s Quaker roots. Boone remains one of the most untarnished historical heroes I’ve ever had the pleasure of researching. Since childhood he’s been my hero. No wonder Kentucky claims him even though he was born in Pennsylvania.

Guest 4

Marth Washington

Martha Dandridge Custis Washington was clever, charming, & wealthy by all accounts. No doubt she’d be able to carry on admirably at the table with the said company given she won George over. I’ve always admired her and her role in our nation’s history, including her journeying to her husband’s winter camps during the American Revolution and raising the spirits of embattled soldiers. She was no shrinking violet nor was George. I’ve even forgiven her for burning all their personal correspondence at his death!

Guest 5

Joseph

Genesis 37~50

One of my favorite Biblical heroes is Joseph in Genesis. His story reads like a great novel only it’s much more epic as it’s truth. We don’t know what Joseph looked like though he is described in Genesis 39:6. His many positive attributes were God-given but the Lord even used his negative attributes and the plot twists in his story to showcase God’s glory and His plan of salvation, even saving hordes of people from actual physical starvation. It’s a moving, beautiful tale of God at work in history, redeeming time and souls.

Guest 5

Sir George, Lord Wedderburn

Last but not least, I would round out my supper guests with my 6th great-grandfather, George Hume of Wedderburn Castle, Berwickshire, Scotland. He’s wearing quite the wig in the old portrait above. On account of him I am in the States rather than Scotland. No Lady Laura for me, sadly! But his legacy and history are the stuff of novels and my first Scottish tale was inspired by him – A BOUND HEART – as is the current manuscript I’m working on releasing in January 2023. He’s that interesting!

 

I’d love to know who’d you invite to a historical supper if you could!

Pin It on Pinterest