Recently my agent, Janet Grant, Books&Such Literary, posed some questions on her blog that I thought might be fun to answer if you’re interested. Here goes…

*Where did the idea for The Lacemaker come from?

A few years ago, my two boys bought me Felicity, an American Girl doll. Since I don’t have a daughter, this is the next best thing! She is perched on an antique wicker stand in a cabin corner and is a continual reminder of my favorite historic site, Colonial Williamsburg. Paired together, they became the seed for The Lacemaker, set in Virginia’s old capital on the eve of the American Revolution. I hope you enjoy Felici – Lady Elisabeth’s – story!

*How did you do your research?

On site at Colonial Williamsburg and around Virginia. I always get a better grasp of the story if I walk the streets or paths my characters do. Granted, there’s a huge leap between the 18th-century and the present day, but I love an excuse to travel, too! And I find the best resources/books at these historic sites that often can’t be found elsewhere, not even almighty Amazon.

*What obstacles did you face as you wrote?

It’s always a challenge trying to subdue my 21st-century mindset and put on the bergère hat, so to speak, of a colonial American woman. Before America was even a country. When women were considered property. When tea and not coffee was the beverage of choice. Sadly, colonial Virginia was fueled by slavery and indentures and other terrible things that don’t always make their way into Christian fiction. It’s a challenge to write around or about those issues and try to do some justice to the time period by viewing them as they did back then.

*What kind of letters/email do you receive from readers?

I get regular mail asking for a sequel to The Frontiersman’s Daughter. Think Captain Jack! Readers think he deserves a story of his own:) I love reader reaction after a book is released, those emotional responses when the story is fresh and on their minds and hearts. I still pinch myself to think that I write anything worth commenting about. Recently I lost 9 years of reader mail in a computer glitch. I was a bit heartbroken! I get the most mail about Courting Morrow Little. Red Shirt has a few fans;)

*And the best of all – what are you working on next?

I’m editing a Scottish novel set in 1752 that is inspired by the life of my greatgrandfather several times over who was a Scottish noble expelled to colonial America early in the 18th-century. My family still lives where he settled in Kentucky today. I never dreamed he would be the template for my fictitious Scots laird and castle, having lost his own title and holdings, including an ancient castle, along the borders. Somehow it seems to write about him is to honor him posthumously.

If you’d like to ask a question, I’d love to answer it, both here and on FACEBOOK LIVE in future!

Thanks and happy reading!